Who we are

We are three potters working together. We had a common vision for a specific product, which has developed into a more complete line of art pottery.  Each of us brings a particular talent needed to produce our work.   We live in a beautiful rural area. We envision the culmination of three lifetimes of artistic endeavor transitioning into a single expressive mode that satisfies our combined aesthetic needs. 



     
             






































































 
Deborah Mitchell a professionally trained ceramist, often includes mixed-media with her clay expression.  There is an emphasis on the transformation of materials by hand and fire.  Intrinsic human-like qualities of an humble, ancient medium reflect the evolutionary life journey of this artist in search of a noble and engaging dialogue. 
 "Everything is about change and our individual acceptance of this permanent force in our life."
"My parents thought with these big hands that I should be a pianist but I took to playing in the creek mud outside instead of tickling the ivories indoors."
Conservative rural Southern up-bringing meets Liberal West Coast art perspective resulting in a challenge that continues to invite expression.
 

Elizabeth Ann Gamelin, clay artist ; is a resident of Mountain Home, Arkansas and owner of Mountain Home Floral Company.  Elizabeth has a background in painting, floral design and ceramic art. She finds inspiration in nature and loves to incorporate leaves, vines and flowers into her functional pottery pieces; making each piece one of a kind functional art.  Elizabeth says," Working with clay is a very fluid art form. You must be open to change; the artist and the clay become partners as the piece takes shape. First, there is the idea that must be combined with the medium to bring an object into being. In that process the clay responds in its own way, and the idea and the clay's inclination have merged into something even better than the original intent. Applying  the glaze and firing the piece is as exciting as the creation of the piece. Adding fire to the equation allows beautiful, unexpected things to happen.  I'm always excited to start the whole process again...I can't stop making pots!"  




Virginia Ann Annett, clay artist; is a resident of Lakeview, Arkansas. Virginia's background is as an educator.   While in California she also studied ceramics at California Polytechnic University and in Santa Barbara with several professional potters.  During her time in Santa Barbara she was able to attend seminars in Raku and primitive firing.  As an educator Virginia was able to use her art teaching Emotionally Disturb children and youngsters with behavioral disorders.